Two female hikers die of 114F heat blisters after hiking in Valley of Fire State Park as temperatures continue to rise

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Two female hikers die of 114F heat blisters after hiking in Valley of Fire State Park as temperatures continue to rise



Two female hikers die in 114F heat after hiking in Valley of Fire State Park.

Nevada State Police were called by a group of hikers on July 22 after the women failed to return from a hike in the park 65 miles north of Las Vegas.

Southern Nevada is still under an extreme heat warning when hikers went missing after temperatures reached 114F on Saturday.

Officers arrived at 2:48 that afternoon and requested a search and rescue team from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department, which found one woman dead on the trail and another in a ravine, according to KLAS-TV.

State police have not released any other details about the incident, including the identities of the women and their cause of death, but the investigation is ongoing.

Nevada State Police were called by a group of hikers on July 22 after the women failed to return from a hike in the park 65 miles north of Las Vegas.

Southern Nevada is still under an extreme heat warning Saturday when hikers went missing after temperatures reached 114 degrees Fahrenheit.

Their deaths come after five other hikers died in US national parks in the scorching heat since June 1.

No previous year has there been so many suspected heat-related deaths in national parks at the same time. According to CNN, the deadliest month for heat in the parks is yet to come with August.

Although the seven deaths are still being investigated, all hikers died in temperatures over 100F in one of four state parks: Valley of Fire, Grand Canyon, Big Bend and Death Valley.

On June 1, a 65-year-old man died while hiking in Big Bend, Texas.

A boy, 14, died on a trail in the same national park in 119F heat, and his stepfather died the same day in a car accident while he was trying to help his stepson.

Seven people have died in four national parks since June 1. Two in Death Valley (including one Steve Curry, who died July 18), two in the Valley of Fire, one in the Grand Canyon (Melanie Hamling, who died July 2) and two in Big Bend National Park.

Melanie Hamling, 57, died July 2 when she went on an eight-mile hike in the Grand Canyon.

Hamling, whose identity has been confirmed by park officials, was hiking with a friend near the Twp. area of ​​the park

On July 2, Melanie Hamling, 57, collapsed and died while hiking in the Grand Canyon with a friend.

Her partner, Russ James, shared the sad news on social media, writing: ‘My best friend, partner and all around amazing person, Melanie Staples Hamling died of heat exhaustion while hiking the Grand Canyon on Sunday.

‘I am heart-broken, lost and unsure of how to go on without him. He was very kind and befriended everyone he met. There is nothing more to say.’

A day later, on July 3, a 65-year-old man was found dead in his car on the side of a road in Death Valley National Park, with rangers suspecting he died from the heat, which reached 126F that day.

Just last week, on July 18, 71-year-old hiker Steve Curry collapsed and died outside a restroom in Death Valley, California, after hiking a nearby trail.

Curry was an experienced hiker, and just hours after answering an LA Times reporter’s question, he asked, ‘Why not?’ He died a few hours later while hiking in 121F heat.

Last week, on July 18, 71-year-old hiker Steve Curry collapsed and died after hiking a nearby trail outside a restroom in Death Valley, California.

Curry was an experienced hiker and died just hours after answering an LA Times reporter’s question about why he couldn’t do it in 121F heat.



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