Dr. Michael Mosley: How to Live a Longer and Healthier Life with These Simple Lifestyle Changes

by NewsTimeOffice



At 65 and a half, I’m fast approaching retirement age (for my old men and women, that’s 66).

While I’m happy to continue doing what I’m doing (writing, TV documentaries, and podcasts), many of my friends are retiring — and most seem content with their new, less prosperous but more comfortable lives.

It obviously depends on your situation, but retirement is clearly appropriate for many of us. A 2016 survey of 300,000 people by the Office for National Statistics found that levels of ‘life satisfaction’ and ‘happiness’, which were lowest among 45- to 59-year-olds, peaked between 65 and 79-year-olds, then gradually declined. .

It’s something to look forward to if you haven’t hit your 60s yet.

Your personality is also important to how much leisure you enjoy.

In a recent survey by Kasetsart University in Thailand, more than 2,000 British retirees aged 50 to 75 were asked to take a personality test and also rate their level of life satisfaction.

In a recent study by Kasetsart University in Thailand, more than 2,000 British retirees aged 50 to 75 were asked to take a personality test and rate their level of life satisfaction.

Those rated ‘conscientious’ or ‘agreeable’ enjoyed leisure the most, while extroverts struggled. Researchers say it’s probably because extroverts miss out on the social interaction you get from working out.

But enjoying your retirement depends on having enough money and reasonable health.

I’ve been thinking a lot about healthy aging recently because I’m currently developing a TV series on super-agers — people in their 70s and 80s whose brains and bodies are decades younger.

A 2016 survey of 300,000 people by the Office for National Statistics found that levels of ‘life satisfaction’ and ‘happiness’, which were lowest among 45 to 59-year-olds, peaked between 65 and 79, then gradually has gradually decreased.

I spent a lot of time talking to scientists about the aging process and why some people seem to age so much slower than others.

Of particular interest is the work being done on ‘epigenetic’ clocks: these are tests used to measure your biological age – how old your body is, not just what it says on your passport.

The traditional view of aging is that it is caused by slow damage at the cellular level.

Just like a car, our bits break or wear. The problem is that it’s hard to put a number on it.

Instead, an epigenetic clock test measures so-called DNA methylation levels: how much special molecules known as methyl groups are present in your cell’s DNA.

You can think of methyl groups a bit like barnacles attaching themselves to the hull of a ship and slowing it down.

As we age, our methyl group levels increase in a very specific way. Epigenetic clock testing is a powerful predictor of healthy aging and longevity.

In a 2016 study, researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) examined blood samples collected from more than 13,000 people before they died. Using epigenetic clock experiments, they were able to predict their lifespan with a high degree of accuracy.

More recently, the same scientists have shown that this epigenetic clock experiment can predict the biological age and lifespan of all kinds of different animals, from elephants to kangaroos, rhinos, and goats.

Dr. Michael Mosley: I’ve spent a lot of time talking to scientists about the aging process and why some people seem to age much more slowly than others.

You can actually buy epigenetic clock tests online, but their real value is in measuring the effectiveness of anti-aging therapies — the idea is that you test before the intervention, then, to see if it made a difference.

Although it sounds counterintuitive, one of the most promising anti-aging therapies today is infused with young blood.

A 2020 study in the journal Science found that giving older mice blood from young, active mice made the older mice smarter, more alert, and caused new brain cell growth. In another study, recently published as a pre-print (meaning it has not yet been formally accepted by a journal), UCLA researchers showed that this type of blood circulation also improved the grip strength of old mice and rejuvenated their hearts, livers and memory. . Amazingly, it also halved their biological age.

Research is now underway to find out exactly what is in young blood that has this remarkable, rejuvenating effect. However, it is not yet used in humans.

Scientists are using the epigenetic clock to test everyday drugs for anti-aging properties.

For example, research published in the journal Cell in 2019 found that taking a cocktail of common drugs can reverse a person’s biological age.

In the study, nine healthy male volunteers aged 50 to 65 took a combination of a growth hormone, metformin (commonly used for type 2 diabetes) and a drug called DHEA (a synthetic version of a hormone produced naturally in our bodies and which helps. Sex hormones such as testosterone and estrogen production).

A year later, not only had their biological age dropped by an average of two and a half years, but their immune systems showed clear signs of rejuvenation. It was a small experiment, so you can’t read too much into it, but a much larger study is now underway.

We won’t be popping anti-aging pills or covering ourselves in youthful blood anytime soon, but there are some lifestyle changes that have been shown to make a difference.

In a study last year in the journal Aging, 43 men were asked to either follow an eight-week lifestyle program — which included intermittent fasting, 30 minutes of brisk exercise a day and twice-daily breathing exercises to reduce stress — or work out. control

After just two months, men in the program reduced their biological age by an average of 1.96 years, while the control group grew slightly older.

So if your job is stressing you out and retiring or going part-time isn’t an option, it might be something you should consider. It may buy you more time.

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