Taliban say they want TikTok banned ‘because it promotes violence’…

by NewsTimeOffice



The Taliban have announced that they will ban TikTok because it promotes violence, with their fighters sharing battlefield atrocities on the platform to spread fear among their enemies.

The Taliban’s Ministry of Telecommunications said PUBG, an online game, will be banned in the country within weeks, along with the popular app.

‘TikTok is spreading immoral and un-Islamic content and videos among the very vulnerable youth of Afghanistan in an Islamic country and we need to block it for the sake of the future of our youth,’ a Taliban official told MailOnline.

Taliban fighters use social media to share their battlefield atrocities to spread fear among their enemies.

‘They are destroying our youth by advertising the western lifestyle. We are living in an Islamic country and these platforms are spreading content against it,’ he said.

‘Similar content is also spreading on Facebook. Our youth are wasting their time. It is our responsibility to take care of the youth,’ the official said.

The telecom ministry said in a statement that internet providers were informed that they have the next 30 days as a ‘deadline’ to ban TikTok.

People can’t use the country’s popular app block.

Afghanistan’s new rulers announced the decision at a meeting with security sector representatives and representatives of the Sharia law enforcement administration.

It comes after recent bans on music, films and television soap operas that saw the Taliban destroy musical instruments.

The telecom ministry said in a statement that internet providers were informed that they have the next 30 days as a ‘deadline’ to ban TikTok.

Telecommunications and Internet service providers in Afghanistan have shared information about the ban and have been asked to follow the guidelines within a specified time frame.

It comes as Taliban fighters use social media to share their battlefield atrocities to spread fear among their enemies.

A video shot and shared on Taliban social media accounts shows a group of five blindfolded fighters tying their hands behind their backs before executing cheering Taliban members.

They have banned TV channels from airing what they consider to be ‘immoral material’ and some channels have even been told that they cannot air foreign films and shows.

Earlier, the Taliban said they had blocked more than 23 million websites for displaying what they considered ‘immoral’ content in the years since the Taliban took power in the country.

‘We blocked 23.4 million websites. They are changing their page every time. So, when you block one website, another will be activated,’ Najibullah Haqqani, the Taliban’s communications minister, said at a conference last month.

Speaking at the same conference, the deputy communications minister, Ahmad Masood Latif Rai, criticized Facebook for its reluctance to cooperate with Taliban authorities in controlling content.

After the fall of the US-backed government and the withdrawal of US troops from the country, an interim Afghan government led by the Taliban came to power on August 15 last year.

Earlier, the Taliban said they had blocked more than 23 million websites for displaying what they considered ‘immoral’ content in the year since the Taliban took power in the country.

Since the Taliban took over Afghanistan in mid-August last year, Afghan media outlets have been given back their rights to operate.

The Taliban occupation has caused an economic crisis and food shortages that have pushed the country to the brink of a humanitarian crisis.

Thousands of Afghans have fled the country fearing the Taliban, rampant human rights abuses and women and girls being denied their freedom.

Since the Taliban took over Afghanistan in mid-August last year, Afghan media outlets have been given back their rights to operate.

According to the UN, the country’s media landscape has undergone significant changes, including the closure of more than half of free media, bans on several channels and websites, and work restrictions, violence and threats against journalists.

After the fall of the US-backed government and the withdrawal of US troops from the country, an interim Afghan government led by the Taliban came to power on August 15 last year.

Taliban fighters celebrate one year since they captured the Afghan capital Kabul in front of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, Aug. 15, 2022.

More than 300 Afghan news outlets have been shut down since the Taliban retook control of Kabul in the summer of 2021, according to the International Organization for Freedom of the Press.

More than a thousand journalists have lost their jobs and hundreds have fled the country, fearing retaliation from the Taliban as Afghanistan’s new rulers label journalists as their ‘enemy’.

Afghanistan’s thriving media sector, which was one of the greatest achievements of the international community’s 20-year presence, is now collapsing.

They have banned women in dramas and ordered channels to stop airing foreign TV dramas produced in Islamic countries such as Iran.

In May, Afghanistan’s Supreme Leader Hibatullah Akhundzada issued an order for women to fully cover their faces in public, ideally with the traditional burqa.

The alarmed Ministry for Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice ordered female television presenters to follow suit.

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